Reviewing Diet Books

The holiday season has come and gone. And that means you’re probably going out in your biggest pair of sweat pants only to have a stranger ask, “Hey, where’d you get those leggings?” 

Okay, so you indulged a little over Christmas. We all do. My low point was eating fudge for breakfast while dancing to Carnie and Wendy Wilson’s "Hey Santa."

Recently, I sat down with Shelagh Rogers of CBC Radio’s The Next Chapter to talk diet books. You can listen to our chat here. Today, I’m rounding up a few key points from the diet books I read to help you on your diet journey.

First up, I tried The Paleo Diet by Loren Cordain. The basic principle is that you eat like a caveman. That means pork chops for breakfast and no sugar. (I guess there wasn’t Dairy Queen in prehistoric times, although I’m sure I remember seeing one on The Flintstones.) I wasn’t hungry while I was on the diet, but dang if I didn’t miss my Lucky Charms. And meat (the real kind, not bologna) is expensive. I ended up losing 3.5 pounds in five days. Which I guess is pretty good. I also had a strong urge to hit things with a stick.

Good morning! Here's your Paleo breakfast. Hope you're hungry. 

Good morning! Here's your Paleo breakfast. Hope you're hungry. 

The second diet book I read was The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet by Herman Townower. Anyone around in the late 70s and early 80s should remember this fad diet. The good news? You can drink all the TAB you want. The bad news? You’re only allowed carrot and celery sticks between meals. And you have to eat lots of grapefruit. I’m sorry, but there isn’t enough Sugar Twin in the world for me to like grapefruit. Also, you need to chew your food a lot. That means no talking while you eat. My mom would have a tough time on this one. I lost 3.5 pounds in five days on this, too. But I was ornery as hell. And my teeth turned orange. 

Your morning can only go downhill from here.

Your morning can only go downhill from here.

The last diet book I read was called The Diet Fix by Yoni Freedhoff. This approach was more practical in that it wasn’t a diet but more about accountability for what you’re stuffing your face with. (I know. A weird concept.) I liked this book because it doesn’t try to make everyone fit into one body type and no food is forbidden. But you have to keep a food diary and cook all your meals. And, no, heating up a Dr. Oetker pizza doesn’t count. 

There you have it. I suffered, dear reader, so that you don't have to. Whatever you do this post-holiday season to lose weight, don’t be hard on yourself. That extra weight will come off. Eventually. Maybe. Now excuse me. I have a date with 50% off holiday chocolates.